Save Money by Choosing the Right Drain Cover

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Rapid Response DrainBlockerFacilities that transfer, store and use oils or hazardous materials need to have plans in place to prevent spills from leaving their facilities. For many sites, these plans often include the use of drain covers – especially during bulk deliveries and bulk fluid transfers.
 
Because most environmental regulations are performance-based, covers can be used proactively (put in place every time fluids are transferred, or for maintenance applications) or reactively (pulled out only if there is a spill). Knowing how a drain cover will be used is the first step in getting the right one for your needs.
 
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Customer Questions: What dike can I use outdoors to confine liquids, and vehicles can still drive over it?

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PIG Drive-Over LeakBlocker DikeAfter years of customer requests and product testing, New Pig developed the perfect dike for outdoor use – The PIG Drive-Over LeakBlocker Dike!
 
We knew that UV protection and the ability to drive over the product were most important for customers looking to contain leaks and drips outdoors.
 
The PIG SpillBlocker Dike is great for controlling leaks and spills indoors where vehicles do not travel, but if you need long-term, outdoor leak control where vehicles travel frequently, you need another solution.
 
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When does one quart of paint cost $78,000?

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Hazmat ShippingWhen it is discovered leaking on an aircraft without the appropriate packaging, labeling or paperwork.
 
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed a $78,000 civil penalty against Amazon Fulfillment Services for an incident in August involving a quart of spilled paint discovered in a FedEx Aircraft.
 
Amazon Fulfillment Services does have an established hazardous materials policy that prohibits many hazardous materials from being stocked or shipped from their fulfillment centers. Looks like this particular quart of high gloss enamel paint snuck through a few of those checkpoints.
 
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Dirty Dozen: 12 Hazardous Chemicals Hiding in Your “Clean” Shop Towels

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Red Shop RagsThey arrive every week—a big stack of laundered red shop towels—ready for cleaning, wiping, and soaking up just about anything. They might look clean, but are they really? You might be in for quite a surprise. But you won’t be alone: In a survey conducted on behalf of Kimberly Clark Professional, about 56% of workers who used shop towels every day weren’t aware of the exposure risks that laundered shop towels present.
 
The Long Journey
 
If shop towels could talk, they’d probably have quite a tale to tell of all of the various places they’ve been and the types of processes they’ve seen. That’s because wipes are generally collected from many different types of facilities before they’re laundered together in large batches. So, your towels are likely to be washed with towels from automotive shops, electronics and heavy equipment manufacturers, food and beverage processing facilities, printers, and other types of businesses in your area.
 
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How do the new EPA Wipe Rules affect you? Use this Infographic to find out!

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Quickstart Guide to the 2013 EPA Solvent-Laden Wipe Rule Infographicv6
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