• Karen

    Karen D. Hamel, CSP, WACH, is a regulatory compliance professional, trainer and technical writer for New Pig. She has more than 22 years of experience helping EHS professionals find solutions to meet EPA, OSHA and DOT regulations and has had more than 100 articles published on a variety of EHS topics. Karen is a Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Walkway Auditor Certificate Holder (WACH), Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) trainer and hazmat technician. She also serves on the Blair County, Pa., LEPC and has completed a variety of environmental, safety, emergency response, DOT and NIMS courses, including Planning Section Chief. She has conducted seminars at national conferences and webinars for ASSE and other national organizations. She can be reached at 1-800-HOT-HOGS (468-4647) or by email karenh@newpig.com.

  • Isaac Granadossays:
    07/04/2016 at 1:57 pm Reply

    I am doing a presentation on Safety checklist, and I have looked over 29 CFR 1910 and 1926. Verbage pointing out to a “How To” of a safety checklist is hard to find, is the directive meant to be broad about this subject, or do you think I overlooked a certain portion of the material?

    • Karensays:
      07/06/2016 at 8:32 am Reply

      Hi Isaac,

      Thanks for your comment! Checklists are a standardized tool that many facilities use to gauge compliance and/or record inspection findings. They are especially helpful for routine inspections because having the inspection items documented on a piece of paper or in an electronic tablet means that that employees do not need to commit all of the inspection items to memory. But, if OSHA has published a comprehensive “how to” on putting together safety checklists, I haven’t found it yet.

      There is some guidance on using checklists in OSHA’s Small Business Handbook. They provide more than 40 sample checklists as guidance documents to help facilities with inspections. OSHA does point out, however, that the checklists they provide in this manual are guidance documents only and not all-inclusive. It is up to the employer to add or remove items so that the checklist created is relevant and comprehensive enough to meet the facility’s specific needs.

      The same is true of any checklist that you may find online or in publications. They should each be reviewed carefully and customized to fit the specific needs of each workplace, process or situation that is being reviewed or inspected. Customizing checklists helps ensure that your site’s specific safety needs are being met. It will also make inspections easier and simplify training efforts.

      Good luck with your presentation!

      Thanks,
      Karen

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